Bleeding gums are the most often symptom of gum disease. But it can also point to other health problems.

Occasional bleeding of the gums can be caused by brushing your teeth too vigorously or flossing too aggressively.

Dental Conditions That Can Cause Bleeding Gums

Dental care issues are the primary cause of bleeding gums. Gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) and periodontitis make your gums sensitive and prone to bleeding.

Gingivitis

Most people develop gingivitis when plaque stays on gum lines too long. Plaque refers to the debris and bacteria that stick to your teeth. Brushing your teeth removes plaque and can prevent you from developing cavities (dental caries). But plaque may stay on your gum line, if you don’t brush and floss properly. If plaque isn’t removed it can harden into tartar (calculus), which will increase bleeding. The accumulation of plaque near your gums can also cause gingivitis.

Symptoms of gingivitis include:

  • puffy gums
  • soreness in the mouth and around the gums
  • bleeding gums

Periodontitis

Periodontal disease (periodontitis) can occur when gingivitis becomes advanced. Periodontal disease is an infection of the gums, jawbone, and supportive tissues that connect your teeth and gums. Periodontitis can cause your teeth to loosen or fall out.

Other Causes of Bleeding Gums

Pregnancy commonly causes of gum bleeding. Hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy can cause the gums to be more sensitive.

Bleeding disorders like hemophilia and leukemia can also increase your risk of bleeding gums. Your gums might bleed more often if you take blood-thinning medications. Drugs in this class include warfarin, aspirin, and heparin.

Treatment of Bleeding Gums

Good dental hygiene is the first step to managing bleeding gums. Visit your dentist twice per year for professional cleaning. Your dentist will let you know if you have gingivitis and teach you how to brush your teeth properly. Proper brushing and flossing can remove plaque from your gum line and reduce your risk of developing periodontal disease.

Use a soft toothbrush. It’ll be gentle on inflamed gums, especially if you experience bleeding after brushing your teeth. Medium and hard bristles are too abrasive for your delicate gums. You might also consider using an electric toothbrush. The specially designed brush heads on these toothbrushes can help you to clean your gum line more easily than a manual toothbrush.

Schedule an appointment with your primary care provider to determine if dental health is not the underlying issue causing your bleeding gums. A physical examination and blood work can help determine the cause of your bleeding. Treatment will vary according to your condition.

CategoryDental Health
Write a comment:

*

Your email address will not be published.

©2019 - Family Health Centers of Baltimore by Sensible Entertainment

Family Health Centers of Baltimore is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization | Headquarters located at 631 Cherry Hill Road Baltimore, Maryland 21225

Family Health Centers of Baltimore (FHCB), is a Federally Qualified Health Center. FHCB is a Health Center Program grantee under 42 U.S.C. 254b, and a deemed Public Service employee under 42 U.S.C. 233 (h).
Family Health Centers of Baltimore is an FTCA deemed facility.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.